Sie sind hier: Projekte > Japanologie Leipzig > Interview

 

Interview with Mōri Yoshitaka
5th May 2011, Kōenji Chūō Park

Interview by Julia Leser & Clarissa Seidel
Transcript and translation by Akai Yasuo


Mōri Yoshitaka (Associate Professor of Sociology, Media and Cultural Studies)) wrote about and gave numerous lectures on the articulation of contemporary art and urban space, cross-cultural studies and social movements. Mōri’s main publications are Culture = Politics: Cultural and Political Movement in the Age of Globalization (2003), Popular Music and Capitalism (2007), and Philosophy in the Streets (2009). In his recent article in J-Fissures, The Beginning of New Street Politics, he considers the current protests in Tokyo a historical moment in Japanese history.
We met him on May 5th 2011 in the Kōenji Chūō Park, the starting point of the Genpatsu yamero Demo on April 4th 2011, to talk about his impressions of the recent developments in Japanese protest culture.


This is where the demo on April 10th started. Since you participated, could you tell us about your impressions on that specific day?

On April 10, the protesters started marching from here [Kōenji Chūō Park]. I came here walking from the station, and found a huge crowd. Many people stood here because they couldn’t enter. In Kōenji, a rally always took place here. A turnout usually ranges anywhere from 10 to 500 people, so this park was large enough. [On April 10th] it was unbelievable that there ended up being too many people to get all of them in the park. But this park was filled with the protesters, and those who couldn’t enter surrounded the park. And in that corner Matsumoto Hajime and the other organizers spoke, and musicians played there. It was an hour or so before the march. The police surrounded the protesters. I wondered whether such a huge crowd was able to start marching.

ここが410日デモが始まった場所です。で、駅からずっと歩いてきたんですけど、この辺から人が多くてですね。こっちのあたりから、全然入れる状態じゃなかったですね。普段高円寺の人たちってここでデモをするわけですけど、多くても500人くらい少ないときだと何十人という規模だと、だいたいここに集まれば本当にいっぱいになるし、本当に公園に入れないなんてことは、まず考えられなかったんですけど。410日のときはここずっと公園だけじゃなくて、公園の周りを取り囲むようかたちで人が集まってきて、ちょうどそこのところで、えっと、松本さんをはじめとして主催者の人がメッセージを、すぴーちをしたり、あるいはあの演奏をしたり、で、だいたい1時間ぐらい前ですかね、デモが始まる前に、そのまわりを警察が取り囲むようなかたちなんですけど。もうその状態でこれはちょっと普通に始められないような感じでしたね。すごく人が多くって。

 

How many people took part in this rally?

No one actually had an idea how many came. According to the organizers, 15,000 turned out. In reality it was impossible to count because some people joined and got out to march freely. The crowd swelled as the march began. Many bystanders at first looked at it curiously, and then eventually joined. When an organizer declared a 15,000-person-turnout, it could have been an exaggeration. But, I estimated it might have been somewhere between 10,000 and 20,000 people, though I couldn’t tell whether 15,000 was the exact number. Even though it is not impossible for a large union or organization to have such a large amount of people, for such a bottom-up protest, it was unprecedented.

よくわからなかったんですけど、まあ15千人ていうのが公式発表ですね。で、実はちょっとわからないのは、歩いてるときにも人が出たり入ったりしている、で途中から参加する人もたくさんいたし、みているうちに興味を持って入ってきた人もたくさんいるので。ふつう15千という数字というのはあまり信用できないこと多いんですけども、たぶんまあ今回は、15千が正確かはともかく、まあ1万人から2万人の間だとぼくは思いますね。それはこういう、もちろん組織が労働組合ですとか、大きな団体がやるときには人を集めることがあるんですけども、全くそうではない、ボトムアップ型のデモとしては空前の人の集まり方でしたね。

 

What sort of people took part in that demonstration?

It was interesting for me that many different types of people were there, and, of course, that many young people showed up. Those people in their twenties, or thirties, might have not marched in the other rallies in different places, but they did in Kōenji – a unique town of young people, especially of rockers and hippie-ish people, and thus of a subculture. Various fashion styles were seen among the crowd – rock, punk, hippie, ethnic, and cosplay. I was also impressed by the families that joined with their children, and those who came as a couple. People from various cultural backgrounds expressed themselves, having placards – as protesters usually do – and playing drums or other instruments. It was as if it was a big festival.

私としてすごく面白かったのは、やはりこう、人の種類が、相当いろんな人が来ていて、もちろん若い人が多いっていうのが特徴なんですよね。それは高円寺っていうのは、普通の日本人にとっては、若者の、とりわけロックとヒッピー、といったらあれなんですけど、独特のサブカルチャーの町だということもあるんですけども、ふつうデモであまり見ないような2030代ぐらいの若い人が多かったというのがあるんですけど、同時にいろんな服装を着ている。そうした町の、ロック系パンク系あるいはヒッピー風の人だとか、エスニック風の、まあ民族衣装風の人もいたんですけど、それ以外にコスプレをしている人だとか、家族連れですね、子供を連れて来ている人たち、あとお父さんお母さんで参加している人が多いというのがとても印象的でした。いろんなグループがいるんですけど、結構こう、普通にプラカード持ってメッセージを出してもいいんですけど、同時に楽器とか太鼓ですとか、そういうのを演奏しながら集まってくる人もいて、ちょっとこう大きなフェスティバルをやっているような感じでした。

 

Did the organizers expect that so many people would show up? Can you describe the atmosphere among the people who gathered in this park?

They did not expect such a huge turnout, so, in a way, they were surprised by themselves. But, what was more curious for me was this: on the one hand, they were obviously very angry because the issue concerning the nuclear power plant accident was a serious one. The words they expressed – such as, I fear the nuclear facilities, or, Stop the nuclear power plants – were seriously angry. On the other hand, they rather appeared to be having fun than to be in a sort of rage. The crowd was lively. Everyone was smiling, happy, and chatty. They greatly enjoyed taking part. The reason for this was obviously that they had missed opportunities to meet other people since the earthquake: parties and concerts had been cancelled. While they had missed opportunities to get together, the confusing news of the nuclear power plant accident had made them want to discuss the issues concerning nuclear power plants. The Kōenji rally really liberated them.

いや、ひとつは、みんなそんなにたくさんの人が集まると思っていなかったので、人の多さにびっくりしているというのはあるんですけども。すごく不思議なんですね。まあひとつはあの、やっぱり原発のことがあるから、結構怒ってる人が多いわけです。あの、メッセージを見ても、本当に原発が怖い、原発やめろ、そういうなんか怒ってる人が多いんですけど、しかもその一方で、怒っている以上に皆その楽しそうにしている、すごく賑やかだし、ニコニコしてるし、明るい、みんなしゃべってるという感じですよね。だから非常にその、楽しんで参加しているという、ひとつはやっぱりあの、大きな理由はやっぱり、地震の後になかなかやっぱり人が集まる機会が減っていた、でとくにいろんなイベントや集会やコンサートがずっと中止になっていたので、たくさんの人が集まる機会そのものが結構減っていたんですよね。その一方で、原発のニュースがあって、みなすごくこう、何が実際起きてるのかわからなかったので、そうしたのをしゃべる機会が、それについて、原発について、たくさん人が集まって議論する機会だということもあって、すごく開放された感じが。

 

Were the Japanese media reporting about this rally?

It was regrettable that the majority of the media did not come to see the rally, especially the TV broadcasters, who did not cover it at all. Only a few newspapers rather briefly reported the 15,000 person turnout. Though it was arguably one of the most relevant protests in Japanese history, the media did not treat it as such. They virtually ignored it.

ああ、それは残念なことにもう当日はメディアが入ってこなかったんですね。とくにテレビが全然報道しなかった。一部新聞では本当に小さく報道されたんですけども、びっくりするような報道はされなかった。ほとんど無視に近いというのが日本のメディア。

 

Why do you think it was ignored by the media?

It was complicated.... The obvious reason was that the Japanese private broadcasters are sponsored by Tokyo Electric Power Company [TEPCO], so they couldn’t criticize it, unless they would be informed that the government would have declared its change in its nuclear policy – which it hadn’t. The second reason was that they were reluctant to cover people’s political actions because they feared that the critical views against the authorities would eventually spread around, as had happened at one point in Japanese history. The third reason was – and this was what the people working at the media said, so I couldn’t verify it – that they were "simply not prepared for showing up at the rally. They simply didn’t expect 15,000 would turn out, so they thought they didn’t have to cover." We didn’t expect the exact number as well, but at the very least we knew that many would come over. It seemed to me that what they said revealed that they were disinterested because of their ignorance about the reality of the popular movements.

あの、これ難しいんですけども。ひとつは日本の特に民放と呼ばれている放送局は、東京電力はやっぱり大きなスポンサーなので、なかなか批判的なことって放送しにくいのはまず第一なんですね。これはもうはっきりしている。政府の方針もまだ原発については今までどおり続行するような方針ですから、それに対して批判的なことは言いにくいっていうのが。というのと同時にやはり日本の歴史的な経緯から、あまり政治的なデモを放送しないんですね。そのことによって批判が広がるのをメディアが恐れているのはあったと思うんですよね。まあ、その2つが大きな理由。3つ目は、これはメディアの人が言ってることなんですが、これはどうなってるのかは本当によくわからないのですが、彼らも準備してなかった。15千人来るとは思ってなかったので、デモがあるのはわかっていたけど、わざわざ取材する必要は無いと思っていたという話です。だからやっぱり、我々は15千という数字は予想してなかったですけど、かなり来るとは予想してましたが、やっぱり今の日本のマスメディアの人たちのこうしたデモに対する彼らの無関心、あまり知らないということがあったんだという気がします。

 

In contrast to the Japanese mass media, a lot of critical information and opinions are provided by the alternative media. On the internet – on blogs, twitter, facebook etc. – you can find a lot of critique about the recent events in Japan. How would you explain this?

A curious division has been created in terms of the relation between the media and the public. The majority of the mass media tell us that we do not have to worry about radiation and nuclear power plants. Especially the TV broadcasters, which are the most influential news source to the public, do so, while the newspapers occasionally cover different views. On the other hand, the internet provides completely different stories for us. Blogs, social media such as Twitter and U-stream now have a huge impact on public opinion. Especially U-stream, which now provides many news channels that cover things the TV will never show, such as in-depth reports about the nuclear facilities and radiation and also people’s political actions. People who watch these sorts of alternative news sources may subscribe to the view that the nuclear facility accident and radiation contamination are actually very serious. Yet only young people and those who are able to use the computer are able to watch these. The division between those who have an access to the alternative sources and those who don’t, has been widened. The people who watch the alternative sources showed up at the Kōenji rally. In fact, the organizers used only the Internet – blogs and Twitter – to announce their plan, this was mainly because they hadn’t enough time to use any other means. But, it was effective enough to make a 15,000-person-turnout possible. It was not like that in the historic protests. For instance, 10 years ago when the Iraq War was getting started, young people actually became politically awakened; of course the internet already existed at that time, yet those young anti-war activists distributed fliers to record shops, bars, and restaurants and people who saw the fliers showed up. The internet was not the central source of information for those actions at that time during the first half of the 2000s. But now, almost all the people who take part in actions are informed by Twitter, blogs, and the likes. How we deal with information has radically changed in the past few years. The Internet, especially the social media side, plays a crucial role in our way of coping with the earthquake and the nuclear power plant accident.

とにかく今の日本の状況で起きてることって、不思議な二極化が起きていて、ひとつはマスメディアのほうは大丈夫ですと、原発心配ありません、ていうのが、大多数のマスメディアのメッセージなんですね。それはテレビも、まあ新聞はちょっと違うんですが、まあテレビは大きいですが、そうなってく。その一方でインターネットのほうには全然違う情報がたくさんあって、ひとつはブログですよね。あとはツィッターに代表されるようなソーシャルメディア、あと何といっても大きかったのはUstreamに代表されるような映像番組ですね。これがかなりそのいろんな番組を作っていて、とりわけテレビでは流さないような、原発の状況や放射能の情報やあるいはこうした政治的なデモンストレーションの情報を流していて、それを見ている人は、かなり実は原発の状態がよくないし、放射能も問題あるということを共有していると。でもそうしたソーシャルメディアというのは若い人を中心に見ているものなんで、あるいはコンピューターリテラシーがある人たちが見ているものなので、そういうものを見てる人とそうでない人との差が、とにかく今非常に広がっている、というのが日本の状況ですね。高円寺に集まった人たちというのはやっぱりインターネットを通じて見てる人は多いし、実際今回は時間もなったせいもあるんですけど、広報がインターネット、ブログやツィッターでやってたんですね。5それで、これがいちばん大きな変化で、15千人集まったことにも繋がるんですけど。実は約10年前にイラク戦争が始まったときの反戦運動ぐらいに、こうした若い人たちは比較的デモをし始めたんですけど、その当時のメディアというのはフライヤーなんです。フライヤーをレコードショップだとか、バーだとか、レストランに置いて、それを見た人たちが集まるというのが、2000年代前半のデモだったと思います。もちろんインターネットはあったんですけど、まだそんなに中心的なメディアではなかったんですが、今回もう100パーセントといってもいいぐらい、そのツィッターあるいはほかのブログとかそういうものを見て、集まってきているんですよね。だから、やっぱりこの23年の間で大きく情報の扱い方が変わってきた。その中で起きた今回の地震だったんで、やはりその、地震の問題にせよ、原発の問題にしても、やっぱり非常にインターネットとりわけツィッターを代表とする、ソーシャルメディアが非常に重要な役割を果たしたと思います。

 

Let’s get back to the topic of the demonstration on April 10. What do you think was different about this rally, why did so many people show up on that day?

Many Japanese people have traditionally associated demonstrations with political ideologies, such as socialism, communism or labor movements and therefore with Marxists, or leftists. During 1968 and 1969, students both in Japan and around the rest of the world revolted. Though the movement decayed, a few student groups still remained active. Political movements have changed during the 40 years since then, but demonstrations still remind Japanese people of the movements of that era. It is fair to say that many people have an allergy to demonstrations, so even young people who are interested in politics tend to hesitate to take part in them. The March 11 earthquake or the nuclear power plant accident in particular, however, has politically awakened today's youths. They have rediscovered demonstrations as one of a few options to make their voices heard. On the other hand, Kōenji’s Shirōto no ran [Amateur’s revolt] and its followers have organized unconventional demonstrations for several years. Their demonstrations – what they call “sound demo” – often involve musicians and parades, playing rap and reggae, and now attract many young people who haven’t been political. This is new.

やっぱりデモンストレーションてもともとそういう経緯があるんですけど、特に日本の場合は、政治的、特にイデオロギー的なものと結び付けられていたんですね。それはまあ具体的に社会主義とか共産主義だとか、あるいは労働組合ですとか、そうしたイデオロギー、とりわけマルクス主義的な左翼の影響が強くあったんです。1968年から1969年にかけて、海外と同じように日本でも学生運動があって、それが衰退した後も、一部党派というのは残って非常にイデオロギー的な運動だったんです。そうした運動というのはもう40年経っていますから、だいぶ変わってきているんですけども、世の中の日本の社会でのデモンストレーションの位置づけというのは、やっぱりその当時の非常にイデオロギー的なデモと結び付けられたんですね。ですから、人々の中には一種のデモアレルギーというのがあったのは事実だと思います。若い人も政治的に興味があってもデモに参加してなかった。でも311日というか、地震のあとに、あるいはそれ以上に原発の事故の後に、若い人たちが政治に関心を持って,そこでどうやって自分たちを表現しようとするかというと、やっぱりデモっていうのは非常に、唯一というか、数少ない選択肢だったと思うんですね。その一方で高円寺ではずっと、まず素人の乱を中心に、非常にユニークなデモというのがこの数年行われていて、それは具体的にはサウンドデモだったり、あるいはミュージシャンが参加したり、あるいはその非常にユニークなラップだとかレゲエのスタイルで町を歩くというのをずっとやってきたんですけど、そうしたデモのスタイルに、それまでは政治に興味が無かった若者たちが、入ってきたというのがいちばん大きな変化だと思います。

 

Do you think that political movements like Shirōto no ran can benefit from the current events?

The name of Shirōto no ran sounds political but it is actually the name of a secondhand store in Kōenji. It is not a political organization in the conventional sense. In short, these youths are merely a group of friends. Each of its members, who may have his or her own political ideas, hang out together around this secondhand store. On the other hand, they are small business owners who are on good terms with other small business owners and shopkeepers in the town. Matsumoto is well-known to Kōenji residents, as are the other members. That is why people do not associate their actions with past political ideologies. A network of friends works well when it comes to taking an action in Kōenji, on the outskirts of Tokyo, rather than in Shibuya or Ginza. The way they are organized is strange. Unlike conventional organizations, they're associated via groups of friendship networks and are not restricted by a certain political principle, affiliation or ideology. Personal friendships play a role. This is new, and interesting.

素人の乱ていうのは、名前はね、かなり政治的な感じがすると思うんですけど、実際には高円寺のリサイクルショップの名前なんですね。ですから具体的に何か政治的な組織があるわけでもなくて、要するに友達が集まっているだけなんですよ。特に政治的な信条が一致しているわけじゃなくて、リサイクルショップのまわりに集まっている、若い人たちだと思うんですね。一方でそういうビジネスをしているので、高円寺の人たちとの関係も非常によくて、松本さん自身が高円寺の中でよく知られた存在だったと思います。松本さんに限らず、ほかのオーガナイザー、組織に関わっている人たちみんながすごくこう、馴染んでいる人たちなんですね。それはやっぱり今回のデモをするときに、さっき言ったイデオロギー的でないという側面を強調するのに非常に役立ったと思うんですね。とくに渋谷でもなく銀座でもなく、高円寺という、東京の中でもちょっと中心ではないところでデモをするにあたって、そうした、かなり友達関係でできているネットワークが非常に有効に機能していると思います。実際、見てて思うんですけども、中心になっているのは友達の友達の友達とか、非常に細やかな人間関係でつくられていて、それまでのやはり政治的なデモというのは、たとえばある種の原理だとか政治的な信条だとか、ひとつのイデオロギーによって組織されたのにくらべれば、やっぱり彼の繊細な人間関係で組織していくのは、新しいし面白いと思うんですね。

 

What makes Shirōto no ran different from well-established organizations and NGOs like, for example, the CNIC (Citizen’s Nuclear Information Center) or Tanpopo? They organize demonstrations as well, i.e. in front of the TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo, but they don’t attract that many people. For the Kōenji rally on April 10, which was organized by Shirōto no ran, 15,000 people participated. Why are they so successful?

That’s difficult to answer.... Those anti-nuclear power plant activists, who have long been existing, now play a crucial role. They are capable of explaining the problems of nuclear power plants and radiation to those particular young people who have never thought about nuclear power plants. They do a great job. Though, so far, when it comes to organizing a demonstration, they remain unable to involve those who have recently become active. A generation gap may be one of the reasons for this. The leaders of those activists are relatively old, and use only conventional means to call people, such as distributing fliers. In contrast to that, the organizers of the Kōenji demonstration used Twitter. But while the old activists and the young activists are very different, they compensate one another. Those who showed up at the Kōenji demonstration had not yet discussed radiation and renewable energy – which is getting more and more attention – and that it might be able to replace nuclear energy for a long time. The old activists have long studied those things and made many proposals. They will probably unite, I guess.

これは難しいですけど。既存のデモ、これまでも反原発をやってきた運動は、ぼくは今回すごく重要な役割を果たしたと思っているんですね。とりわけやっぱりその、原発のことを考えたこともないような若い人たちに、原子力発電所の問題だとかあるいは放射能の問題というのを、わかりやすく説明してきた。そういう意味では既存の団体はほんとうにすごくよくやったと思うんですね。その一方で、デモの組織ということに関して言うと、やっぱりその、ほとんど新しい人を巻き込むことがまだできていないでいるのだと思います。それは世代的な問題もある。中心にいる人が比較的年が上で、人の集め方もこれまでの人集めのやりかたを中心にしているんですね。たとえば、ビラを配ったり。たぶん、そうじゃないような、人の集め方が、ツィッターを使ったりとかがあって、そこがたぶん今までの反原発運動の組織と今回の高円寺とのちがいだと思いますね。だからすごく違うんですけど、でも同時に補完していると思います。というのは、高円寺に集まってきた人たちは、じゃあ本当に放射能のことだとか、あるいは最近よく言われる代替エネルギー、じゃあ原発に代わるエネルギーの問題ということについて、どれだけ議論してきたかというと、やっぱりあまりしてきてないんですよ。それはやっぱりこれまで、反原発運動に関わってきた人たちが、やっぱりいろんな形で研究をしてきたし、提案もしてきてるんで、おそらく今後は一緒にやっていくんじゃないかという気がぼくはしてますけどね。

 

Do you think that this is a historical moment for Japanese radical politics and protest culture?

Yes. I think so. There have been protests for a decade now. As I have mentioned before, the anti-Iraq War movement was big. But, this movement couldn’t spread much further. There were not enough participants. Since the students’ revolt occurring in 1968 and 1969, or the 1970s, it has long been said that young Japanese people are politically apathetic. It is true that many young people were not interested in politics. But, they have returned to politics due to a 10-year recession. On the other hand, there have been a few opportunities for them to express their opinions. It appears that each of them has sought his or her way of dealing with politics, but there hasn't been a big forum, so they haven’t worked together. This issue of nuclear power plants provides an opportunity for them to unite towards a shared goal. In this sense, it is a memorable momentum throughout the history of post-war Japanese politics, especially in terms of young people’s political activism. Additionally, this young people’s activism is not only political but also cultural: music, performing arts, and visual arts are present. Political aspects and cultural aspects are mixed, generating the festival-like atmosphere at those demonstrations – this is the future of the current movement. We have been interested in demonstrations that take place in Europe and America, and we have long discussed why those take place in Germany, Britain, and America, but not in Japan. Now we finally see those sorts of demonstrations that we have only seen through the overseas media begin to take place in Japan.

はい、ぼくはそう思います。もちろんこの10年、さっきも言ったんですけどイラクの反戦運動はかなり大きかったんですね。でも、どこかイラクの反戦運動ていうのは、ひろがりを持つことができなかった。それは人数の面で、そんないたくさん集まってこなかったんですけど、ある意味では1968年から1969年にかけて、70年を境に、日本の若者たちは政治に関心が無いといわれ続けてきた。実際に多くの若者たちは政治から遠ざかっていたんですけども、この10年ぐらいまではずっと、景気の悪いこともあって、若者たちは政治に戻ってきた。とはいえ、彼らが何かをこう、そうした政治的な意見を表明する場所っていうのはそんなにあったわけじゃなくて、あの印象ではこうみんないろんなことで政治に関わってきたんですけども、必ずしも一緒に何かやってきたわけじゃないんですね。今回の原発の問題というのは、おそらく日本の政治史においてもだし、戦後の政治史においても、あるいは特に若い人たちの政治運動についても決定的なのは、やっぱりまあシングルイシューといえばシングルイシューなんですけど、ひとつの目的に向かって非常に多くの人たちが集まること。もうひとつは、そうした政治なんだけども同時にそこに音楽があったり、パフォーマンスがあったり、いろんなデザインの表現があったり、非常に文化的な要素があって、そうした文化的な要素と一体化したような、なんか大きなフェスティバルというような、そうした感じでデモが起きていることが、今回の大きな特徴だと思うんですね。われわれは、まあヨーロッパやアメリカのデモに関心を持ってきた人たちは、何でああいうデモがドイツやイギリスやアメリカで起きるのに、日本でないんだろう、とずっと言ってきたわけですけども、海外でぼくらがメディアを通じて知っていたようなデモが、おそらく日本ではじめて起こりつつあるということだと思 うんです。

 

This protest now is mainly anti-nuclear. But are there different topics that can be associated with this? For example the horrible situation of the workers in nuclear power plants. What other problems are linked to this topic, which problems should be mentioned in these protests or are actually mentioned?

That’s a hard question. One thing is clear: any one of the protesters who marched in Kōenji will say that the problem is not only about nuclear power plants. Everyone knows that the real problem might be the Japanese social structure. Japan has only pursued effectiveness, wealth, and economic success. Against this backdrop, numerous nuclear power plants have been built, while many of us haven’t noticed this side. Moreover, the Fukushima problem is also Tokyo’s. Fukushima has supplied power to Tokyo. Though we more or less knew this, we haven’t really thought about what it means. This nuclear power plant problem urges us to look at the initial structure upon which made Fukushima possible. Something is seriously going wrong with Japanese society, or Japanese capitalism. Therefore, the problem of nuclear power plants is not just about nuclear power plants themselves, but also about those temporary workers, known as ‘freeters,’ whose number has rapidly increased since the 1990s. Also, the nuclear power plant workers are a group of people who have to accept the danger of the workplace, the plant needs these people. We now talk about the Tokyo Electric Power Company [TEPCO], obviously. TEPCO has many subcontractors that hire these workers. Many of those workers obviously know the danger of nuclear power plants and radioactive material. But they have various reasons for accepting these dangers. We now face the fact that we have effectively agreed to sacrifice those people, and begin to question it. This movement aims to stop nuclear power plants, but also problematizes Japanese society and Japanese capitalism. In the past, in terms of problematizing capitalism, we tended to think that someone else will change it for us. But now, we think that instead we must change our way of living. So far we have used power freely, and taken it for granted. We should probably use less power than we have done, or seek another way of living. We should no longer pursue only effectiveness or wealth, but, by pacing ourselves, seek an alternative way of living. We have just started thinking about those things. This is what this anti-nuclear movement is all about.

難しいな。ひとつはね、すごくはっきりしているのは、今回のデモでね、みんな言っているんですけど、単に原発の問題ではないとみんな思っているわけですねむしろ、日本の社会が持っていたそもそもの構造ではないかという気がします。より具体的には、やっぱりその、便利さを追求してきた、豊かさを追求してきた、経済的な成功だけを追及してきた日本の経済があって、おそらくこうしたものがあったからこそ、原発というのはこんなにたくさんいつの間にか造られてきたと思うんですよね。しかも福島の問題というのは、実は東京の問題で、東京の電力を供給するために福島があって、皆そのことにうすうすは知っていたのだけれども、みな自覚したことは無かったのだと思います。でも、そうした構造自体がそもそも問題だっていうのはみな気が付いたのが、今回の原発の事故で、それはやっぱり、今の日本の社会が持っている、あるいは今の日本の資本主義が持っている、大きな問題自体になにか無理があった、そうして考えると、原発の問題てさっきも言ったように、原発だけの問題じゃなくて、おそらく90年代以降飛躍的に増えたフリーターの問題だし、もっと言ってしまうと、原発産業を支えてきた人たちが必要なわけですよね。非常に危険な作業をやってくれるような層。具体的には、やっぱり今回も、原発の中で東京電力ももちろんいろんなこと言われてますけど、東京電力から下請けで仕事を請けて働いているような人々ですね。彼らの多くはやっぱり、もちろん原発なり放射能が危険だということはわかっているわけです。でもそうした危険さを覚悟の上で働かなければならないような、いろいろな事情があるわけですね。あるいは、そうしたことを可能にしている社会の合意があるわけで、やっぱりそこのところをみんな考え始めたんだろうと思うんですね。もちろん運動としてはこれ、原発止めろという運動なんだけれど、同時に日本の社会全体、あるいは日本の今の、資本主義全体が持っている問題を考え直さなければいけない。それも、資本主義の問題って今までは誰かが変えればいいとおもっていたんです。むしろ、我々の生活自体を変えなければいけない。たとえば我々はこれまで電気を本当に自由に使ってきたし、それは当然だと思ってきたけれども、ひょっとすると、我々がこうした電気を電力を使うこと自体を少し制限しなければならない。あるいは今われわれがもっているような便利さだとか豊かさだとかいうのを、すこしスローダウンして、ちがうオルタナティヴな生活をしなければならないというふうに、気が付き始めたのだとおもうんですね。それが今回の反原発運動のいちばん大きなポイントだと思います。

 

Do you think that the recent protest is able to change something in Japanese politics and society?

That’s a very difficult question. As I have said before, Japanese people are now divided into two groups. On the one hand, there are those who collect information through the Internet or the other alternative media. On the other hand, there are those who don’t. Moreover, there are those who think that nuclear power plants are necessary because the Japanese economy is going down due to the disaster. It is difficult to say if the protest will bring a radical change to politics. Please note that even if nuclear power plants stop their current operations, it will take more than 10 years just to fully shut them down, dismantling and then dealing with the waste will be another 100-year project. Stopping the operations won’t end the problem. The next step will be crucial, and it will take a very long time to deal with it. Given all this difficulty, things are certainly changing now. A 15,000 turnout is unprecedented. What if this becomes 100,000 or 200,000? The mass media, though they haven’t covered the protests so far, can no longer ignore them. Politicians basically do whatever they can do in order to get elected, so if this anti-nuclear power plant movement becomes bigger, they will no longer ignore the protesters’ opinions. Moreover, let’s think about the victims. Compensation for the victims is likely to be prolonged. Their plight will be prolonged – it will get worse in summer. This is not a question whether or not to change. We must change. I really expect this will happen. Another big demonstration will take place next week. And I have also heard that a huge united action in June is planned. If there is a huge demonstration around that time, the public opinion, especially the mass media’s, will change, and thus it will be the tipping point.

とても難しい質問です。今ですね、さっきも言ったように、やっぱり日本の社会がかなり二分化されてて、そうしたインターネットを見たり、いろんな形で情報を集めているような人と、そうじゃない人と別れている。あるいはその、日本の経済が悪くなるときに、やっぱり日本の原発が必要だと思っている人が、かなりたくさんいますね。だから変わるかどうかということについては、まだ難しいことがあると思います。でももっと言うと、原発すぐに止めたからといって、明日から止まるものではなくて、結局とめるだけで10年以上かかるし、全部の処理を含めると100年近くかかるプロ時会苦とになるんですね。そういう中で、止めたからといってすべてが終わるわけじゃ全然ないんですね。止めた後にどうするかっていうのが、とても重要な問題になってくるし、処理にものすごい時間がかかると思います。だから、とても難しいというのを前提にして言えばですね、でも確実に変わってきていると思うんですよね。今回15千人で、画期的といえば画期的なんですけど、これが、たとえば10万人とか20万人とかいう数になってきたら、となる。今までメディアは無視してきましたけど、マスメディアも無視できなくなる。当然政治家というのは基本的に選挙に勝つためなら何でもしますから、当然反対運動が大きくなれば無視できなくなってくるんですよね。おそらくまあ、今後の保障の問題がかなり難航するでしょうから、今被害を受けている人たち、というのも、この夏ぐらいにかなり厳しい状態になってくると思うので、そういうことを考えると、やっぱり、変わるかどうかということよりは、変えなければならないと思っているんですね。それはまあ期待も込めてなんですけど。やっぱりこれ次の、まあ、本当にいまちょうど、来週のデモが迫ってますけども、それしだいだし、聞いてるところによれば、6月に大きな統一行動を予定していると、聞いているんですけど、だいたいそのころぐらいにでもが大きくなればですね、すごく世論が変わってくるだろうとおもいます。特にマスメディアの対応が変わってくると思います。で、そのときが、次の大きな転機だと思います。

 

I’m finished with my questions, but if there is anything you want to add, please tell us.

How people reacted to the accident varied. Some people moved out of Tokyo, especially to western Japan. It was understandable. Some people even left Japan. No one really knows how this radiation will affect us, precisely. You came over to shoot us, but I can’t guarantee your safety. Everyone sort of feels as though it is not really safe to be here. What this transformation of Japanese society, or what those demonstrations show, is that we know that we will live with fear of radiation even 10 years from now. There is a possibility that we will continuously be exposed to radiation for a long time. It will influence our way of thinking. The problem is not just whether or not to stop nuclear power plants, but, also, to face the fact that, because a large amount of radioactive materials were spewed, we must think about what living with radiation really means. Also, this is about the people in Fukushima. Many of them may actually want to leave, but most of them will stay. There is a health concern regarding the children in Fukushima City, but they cannot simply come here to Tokyo. They are not sure if they can find a job in Tokyo, so they remain in Fukushima. Our movement should involve the people from Fukushima. Tokyo is relatively safe, compared with Fukushima. But we are not so sure about our safety. So, we should work with the people from Fukushima. It is very important that together, we and the people from Fukushima, think about nuclear power plants. We tend to easily estimate the fact that they are against nuclear power plants. But, the truth is not that simple. Ōtomo Yoshihide, a musician who is from Fukushima, is now planning to do a project in Fukushima. He said to me that the people there cannot say that they are against nuclear power plants. I asked why, and what he said was this: “A man stabbed with a knife can die instantly, so you can say that a knife is bad. But radiation is a knife you will only feel pain from 30 or 50 years later. Can you ask someone being stabbed if he is for or against knives? It’s meaningless. It’s not really sensitive to ask such a thing.“ For the people in Fukushima, it’s not time to think about whether nuclear power plants are good or bad. The people have been stabbed, so they want to be saved first. Radiation may affect their health, but, more seriously, it may affect their minds. They are psychologically damaged. So we have to save their minds first, before asking them if they are for or against nuclear power plants. Ōtomo made me think a lot. Of course I want this anti-nuclear power plant movement to achieve its goal. Though, on the other hand, we have to think about the people in Fukushima. Moreover, we have to think about the history – why Fukushima had to accept nuclear power plants. Fukushima was poor, having no significant industries. While Tokyo had everything, Fukushima had nothing to produce things on its own, so its people had to invite nuclear power plants in order to make a living. This must change, or those people cannot fight against nuclear power plants. I’m going to keep thinking about this.

今回の、人々の行動、まあいくつかあるんですね。ひとつの行動としては実は東京から離れた人もいろいろいるんですよ。とりわけ西のほうに。引っ越したりとか。気持ちはわかるんです、とても。あるいは海外に出てしまったりとかね。じっさいあの、放射能についてはだれもこう、正確なことがわからないし、こうやって撮ってますけど、本当は危険なのかもしれない、とみんななんとなく思ってるんですね。ひとつはたぶん日本の社会とかあるいは今回のデモもそうなんですけど、とはいえ、この10年ぐらいは放射能の恐怖といっしょに生活しなければならない、という覚悟をみんなしてるんだと思いますね。ある意味では放射能を何らかの形で取り続ける可能性が出てきた、それはものの考え方にいろいろ影響を与えるんだろうと思いますね。だから、単純に原発をとめるとか、止めないとかいう話じゃないんですよ。むしろ、放射能が今かなり出てきている状態の中で、それと一緒に生活するということはどういうことなのかということがひとつあるし、もっと言うとそれは福島の人たちのことをどう考えるかということに関係ある。彼らの多くはひょっとするとものすごく逃げたいのかもしれないけども、実際には多くの人はほとんどの人はとどまっているわけですね。福島氏では子供たちの健康がすごく心配されているけど、かと言って、東京に行くこともできないし、東京に来ても仕事があるかどうかわからない状態で、生活している。むしろこれからの運動は、福島の人とどういうふうに一緒に関われるかということにすごくかかわってると思いますね。東京にいるということ福島にいるということはもちろん、東京のほうが比較的に安全なんですけど。でも、それは本当に安全なのかはわからないわけでしょう。だから、福島の人たちとどういうふうに関わってゆくのか…これから福島の人とどういうふうに原発のこと考えるかということがとっても大事なことだと思います。外から見ると、福島の人てね、みんな原発に反対だろうというふうに簡単に言うんですけども、そんなに簡単な話じゃないんですよ。実際に聞いてみると。音楽家の大友良英さんが言ってたんですけど、彼福島出身で、福祉までプロジェクトしようとしてるんですけど、福島の人にとって原発反対って今言えないと。どうしてかって言うと、たとえばこう考えてほしいと。「ナイフで人が今刺されたと。ナイフの場合はすぐ死んじゃうからね、それは良くないってわかるんだけども、放射能の場合はナイフでさされても、3050年たってから痛いとわかるようなものだ。」と言ったんだけど。「で、そのときにナイフで刺された人に対してあなたはナイフに反対ですかって事を聞いてもあまり意味が無くて、そういうこと聞くこと自体が、すごく失礼だしおかしいんだ。」という話だったんですけども。で、それはかといって、放射能も全くそうで、福島の人にじゃあ今、原発反対ですかって今聞いても、そんな状態じゃないんだと。先ず、ナイフで刺されているんだから自分たちを救ってほしいというのがまずあると。それがそういうものであれ、それはたんに放射能っていう、実際にこの健康に影響はあるということもあるけれども、それ以上に精神的な問題ですね。精神的に非常にダメージを受けているから、それに対して救ってあげるということをしなきゃいけなくて、ナイフ反対とか賛成とかじゃなくて、その人たちを救えるかどうかなんだと。その話はすごく考えさせられたんですね。反原発の運動ってのはまあ、もちろんこれはこれで成功してほしいのだけど、それと同時に今実際福島をどう考える勝手いうのが、とても大事になっているし、それはもっと言ってしまうと、なぜ原発とか受け入れてきたのかという歴史ですね。それは経済的に非常に困窮していたし、それ以外にも、表立った産業もなかった。東京一極集中の中で、まあ福島は産業らしい産業はなかったから原発を誘致して瀬かつをせざるをえなかったという事情を解決しないことには、原発なくせという話にはなかなかなっていかないと思うんですよ。だからそこも含めて考えていきたいなと思います。

Besucher gesamt: 299.867